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Thursday, 24 September 2020

OAU Admission: Who Gets it Who Doesn't (TAGS: OAU, NAIRALAND, GOOGLE, POSTUTME, POST JAMB, CUT OFF, CUTOFF MARK, SCREENING, RESULT, ADMISSION, NAIRALAND)

OAU Admission: Who Gets it Who Doesn't

This article is definitely going to be my most unnecessary article ever; because seriously, I have no need to make any article of this kind. I should feel less-concerned about who applies to OAU with about 100,000 more applicants and eventually gets admitted to be among the just about-7,000-to-11,000 applicants OAU admits per admission session. But considering the figures I just stated about how many JAMB applicants OAU has per year and the tiny number of them OAU admits per year, it becomes necessary that someone cares enough to give out tips on what to do and what not to do to get admitted to OAU. Oh, lest I forget, when I said only about 7,000 to 11,000 applicants are admitted per year, I said that to include the UTME applicants, the Direct Entry applicants, and of course the Pre-Degree applicants. If you understand what that means you’ll understand we are talking about the do-whatever-you must-do-to-get-admitted kind of competition here; and this is why I'm making this write-up. You know, many of the applicants just choose OAU in their applications and not even reason the competition they are about to get into. Some of these applicants believe so much in their A-and-B-parallel O/Level results, and their high scores in the UTME and Post-UTME screening. They—because of these—apply for the admission and start acting like their admission is assured. They become obnoxious and impossible to instruct; they just feel within themselves like they have all it takes to be in OAU, and they act just that way.

But unfortunately for them, their guts fail them most of the times. As an educational consultant, this is why I prefer to deal with my candidates’ parents and not the candidates. Not just because the parents are mature, more careful and meticulous, but also because the parents have the understanding that a lot is happening in our educational system that is very different from what they were used to; so—they for this reason—calm down and listen to instructions and indeed observe the instructions meticulously. That is why it is arguable that applicants who have parents who are involved in their admission processing most of the times get the admission. In this kind of situation, I always say such candidate gets the admission not because of his/her smartness, nor because of his/her high scores, but because of his/her parents who are meticulous, curious and desperate to make sure their child gets admitted by all means. To talk from experience, most of the applicants are always over-confident and—they too often—consider themselves smarter than the consultant who has been in the business of admission processing for years with a very rich year-in-year-out experience on the school they are trying to get into; and this is why many of them become confused when all the admission lists are released and their names are not on any of the lists despite the high scores they hold.

I always say, it is one thing to have high scores, it is another thing to deserve OAU admission. Deserving OAU admission requires knowing OAU or having someone who does. I'm saying, OAU is very predictable, but it takes knowing the school or having someone who does to get the predictions right. Candidates who depend so much on their own knowledge of OAU—most of the times—don’t get admitted! Candidates who depend so much on the information and instructions they get online and on those Whatsapp groups end up losing their chances of getting admitted to doing something they are not asked by the institution to do; but because someone they met online did it, they just go ahead and do it too. I must not forget to talk about people who apply to the highly competitive departments like Medicine, Law, Accounting, Economics, Nursing, and after applying go ahead relenting and relying on their high scores to get them the admission. With a straight face now, if you are one of such candidates, I'm saying: forget your high score! Okay? Forget your high score, and don’t mind them when they say you don’t have to know people to get admitted to OAU; believe me, that notion is not meant for anyone who wants to get into the highly competitive courses. These highly competitive departments are where the children of the people who drink and flex with the authorities want to enter; and believe me you, whether these children get the cutoff or not is never an issue, they get in somehow! They get in to make it harder for the ones who know nobody but score higher to get admitted; and that’s what makes getting into these departments highly competitive.

Don’t forget these lines I have used in this article because they were carefully used to pass a serious message: one, OAU admission is competitive, getting it takes determination, being meticulous, and the will to do and offer anything to get the admission. Two, getting admission to Medicine, Law, Accounting, Economics, Nursing, Dentistry is—in that order—highly competitive, it takes only the fierce, the desperate, and the one who is willing to do and offer anything to get it—especially when the professors in the administration of the  institution are not your persons. My blunt conclusion is: if you want to be admitted to any of the departments mentioned above, your high score is only about 10% relevant here; who you know, and how they can help you is what is 90% relevant. If you do not observe what I just said about getting admitted to study in OAU, your chances of getting admitted is almost 0%. If you do not observe what I just said about getting admitted to the highly competitive departments, your chances of getting admitted is flatly 0%—no matter how high your score is. Lastly, if you think you are experienced than the educational consultant who has been in the system for several years, I can only hope you don’t end up wasting your high score and one whole year of your academic life.




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